5 Golden Tips for Making Your Firm’s Transition to BIM

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Global BIM adoption rates have exploded in the last decade. In 2007, only around 17% of North American contractors used BIM software in their building projects; by 2012, that figure had increased to 70%. According to recent study findings in the United Kingdom, 97 percent of businesses will be adopting BIM over the next five years.

However, as more companies understand the potential of BIM and begin to integrate it into their processes, they are realizing that the transition is not always smooth. BIM’s possibilities are extensive, and the software is both strong and complicated; but, without a thorough grasp of the technology and how to properly use it, you risk missing out on possible benefits and potentially jeopardizing operational efficiency. We highlight the significance of a tripartite approach at VIATechnik, in which people, process, and technology are all equally valued. Bim software training in Dubai for those individuals who are interested in integrating multi-disciplinary data to create a detailed digital representation managed for real-time collaboration.

  1. Carry out your homework

Most likely, your choice to adopt BIM was based on a significant amount of study, but that research should not stop now that you’ve made your decision. It’s critical to understand what your company is getting into before starting the transformation, especially in terms of how BIM will affect your team’s current operations. In BIM designs, for example, some aspects must be worked out considerably sooner than in many traditional 2D models. These kind of workflow improvements necessitate a shift in employee attitude, and it is your duty as a key decision-maker to lay the basis for these changes early on.

  1. Encourage Employees to Purchase

People are cautious of what they don’t know or understand, therefore it’s critical to make the benefits of BIM clear to every member of your team from the start. Furthermore, their passion and personal investment are just as important as their general understanding in making a successful shift to BIM. As a result, you should make a point of stressing how BIM will help each individual employee as well as the company as a whole.

  1. Increasing the Size of Your Team and Capabilities

Of course, the comfort level of your team with your selected technology is critical to a successful BIM programme. Many organisations assume that by employing a single BIM engineer, they would be able to establish a BIM programme; sadly, this is not the case. Because BIM software is so flexible, it needs a wide range of abilities in order for its full potential to be fulfilled. For example, the abilities required to lead BIM coordination differ from those required to create a 3D model; the person doing an on-site laser scan, as well as the person registering the point cloud and translating it into a BIM environment, will almost certainly have distinct talents.

  1. Recognize that technical upgrades are required.

BIM software is capable of incredible things, but its baseline operating needs are significantly higher than those of traditional CAD platforms. As a result, your company will almost certainly need to make major hardware changes to support the new software. Furthermore, because BIM is still a relatively new design technique, it will continue to evolve in the near future. As a result, it’s probably a good idea to invest in technology that’s a step up from “adequate” to ensure that you’ll be ready when BIM software gets more powerful — and even more demanding.

  1. Create an implementation strategy.

It’s useful to set up a strategy for how your business will really put BIM into action once you’ve laid the groundwork for an effective BIM protocol by getting your team on board, preparing your employees, and updating your technology. A BIM implementation strategy, like constructing a structure, needs meticulous planning and attention to detail. Each company has its unique set of circumstances that influence the way it implements BIM, but regardless of your details, every stage of the process should be meticulously prepared ahead of time. BIM is about enhancing efficiency at its heart, and an ad hoc, “let’s see what happens” implementation would almost certainly damage its potential to produce value.

  1. Try out a new idea using a pilot project.

For most businesses, a full-scale BIM deployment is unlikely to be the best initial step. Instead, try launching a pilot project to allow your team to iron out the wrinkles that come with implementing a new design strategy. You reduce the danger of technical glitches and growing pains derailing your capacity to deliver for existing and new clients as you bring your programme up to speed by gradually expanding BIM usage.

  1. Keep track of performance to see how much value you can provide over time.

You’ll need to define some clear goals and then develop an analytical framework to track your progress toward reaching those goals if you want your BIM approach to pay off in the long run. Choose a few important indicators (e.g., effect on project deadlines, downstream rework reduction, etc.) that will genuinely distinguish a successful approach from one that fails, and make sure your team is measuring them throughout the project’s lifecycle.

  1. Make Collaboration a Priority

BIM is well acknowledged as a strong rendering, scheduling, and estimating tool, but its ability to enable collaboration and integrative design processes is often overlooked — or at least undervalued. Architects, engineers, contractors, subcontractors, and other project stakeholders must actively cooperate on a single model for BIM to be fully realized.

  1. Strive for Innovation (but not at the expense of your health)

Because BIM is still a developing technology, there are lots of possibilities to get creative and find new methods to provide your clients with greater value and capabilities. As a result, make sure you embrace new technology at a controllable pace and in a way that suits your company’s long-term objectives. Sure, everyone is enthralled with VDC technology, but if you’re still having trouble with MEP coordination, you shouldn’t be focusing all of your efforts on augmented reality. Strive for innovation, but be aware of where you are on the technology acceptance curve so you can make sensible investments that will assist, not hinder, the development of your BIM program.

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